Home Health Care – The Basic Guide

Home health care is now an important and very real part of life in the United States. The population is aging year by year, thus pointing to the fact that a good percentage of people will need home health care in the years to come. As people get older, their bodies degenerate and they find themselves increasingly unable to get around without help. They may even find themselves housebound after a while, or prefer to stay at home rather then be admitted to hospital. Either way, home health care can provide them with exactly what they are looking for! Personal care is just as important as medical care for the elderly and disabled, and not as expensive as hospital care.

Hospital workers, whether doctors or nurses or health care assistants, are all highly skilled and well worth the money charged to you in most cases, but the majority of people only need limited care for a specific period of time. If the required care is ongoing then the bills for the bed, food and services will soon mount up. However, home health care eliminates the need for two of the charges, only leaving the care service aspect to worry about. Home health care will most definitely benefit these types of people far more and will also provide the post-hospital care that is desperately needed.

The Advantages Of Home Health Care

Home health care can ensure that individuals with ongoing care needs vet the treatment they need in the comfort of their own home. This environment actually encourages recovery because it is a comfortable environment to recuperate, with all of an individuals friends, family and possessions around them. The familiar definitely holds some sort of healing properties. This is one of the reasons why new mothers often choose to give birth at home or return home within hours of it. Home health care assistants and mobile midwives provide the treatment needed. Their absence from hospital also frees up more beds for those that are next in line to have a baby or for treatment so it provides a good deal for all concerned.

Those with long-term illnesses are more often than not cared for at home these days because they can only be made comfortable and do not need surgery. A wide range of home health care professionals may visit them on a daily basis to make sure that there is no change in their condition and to administer ongoing care. Such home health care professionals have often reported that being at home does more for a patient’s mental state than a hospital could ever do. With these types of reports showing definite benefits to home health care, everyone should consider it as an option for recovery.

Why Choose Home Health Care?

Increasingly, families are making the decision to have health care provided in their own homes. With 10,000 Americans turning 65 each day in 2011, the need for quality, affordable health care becomes an increased concern across the U.S. The aging baby-boomers – it’s anticipated that by 2030 the number of people over 65 will exceed 70 million – are now in a position where they need extra help with chronic conditions and daily activities, but don’t want to lose the independence and comfort of their homes. In addition, the high costs of hospital and facility stays can cause a frightening financial burden. While not everyone who needs health care assistance is a senior citizen – like new mothers and singles living without family nearby – the focus is often on the baby-boom generation.

There is scientific evidence that supports the belief that people heal faster and feel better when allowed to be at home. Certainly the amount of germs and sources of infection are less when in a home environment over an institution. The psychological benefits are undeniable; when asked, most people who are hospitalized with an illness “just want to go home.” This also allows family to stay with the person in need, providing them with the knowledge that they are still in the loop of their loved-one’s health issues.

Routine can be essential for physical and emotional well-being. A home health care provider will help maintain the discipline of scheduled medications and therapies within a framework of personal routine. Allowing a patient the comfort of keeping their normal, daily routine in their own home adds to the quality of life and sense of safety. In addition, the health care provider can watch for changes in habits, attitudes, and demeanor that can be indicators of larger problems. The emotional well-being extends to those who live with the patient, as it can be difficult to care for a family member with so many other demands – like work or children – that divide their time. Lack of health care knowledge can put a strain on relationships between family members. With the help of a trained home caregiver, family can enjoy being with each other while still getting the best attention to health issues.

Sometimes, it is the simple things that can mean a huge difference in the health of someone in need of care. Having a health care provider come in a few times a week to fix a meal, assist with personal hygiene, and make sure that items are picked up for easy movement about the house can prevent illness or injury from poor nutrition, infection, or accidents. This type of service is also very beneficial to new mothers or those recovering from surgeries, etc. that are without the luxury of nearby family or friends to help during the first few weeks home.

An additional advantage to the comfort and health benefits is that it makes more economic sense to have a provider in your home. Lengthy stays in a hospital or institution can add up to thousands of dollars very quickly, compounding the stress in your life. By comparison, home health care is significantly cheaper, giving you more options with your health care dollar.

A home health agency is strictly regulated, meeting federal requirements and regulations to assure you that your home care provider is highly trained. While they are not a substitute for a doctor’s care, they can be an essential supplement to daily routine; keeping you healthier, and happier for years to come.